Foot Strike and Injury Risk in Runners: My Article in Lower Extremity Review

Boston Elite Runner FootstrikesA few months ago I received an email from the editor of Lower Extremity Review asking if I’d be willing to write an article on the topic of foot strike in running. Given that the publication’s target audience consists of medical practitioners who regularly treat lower extremity injuries, I was a bit hesitant at first to accept the assignment since I am not a clinician.

However, having just written a chapter for my book on the topic of foot strike in running, I had read through much of the existing academic literature on the relationship between foot strike and running injury risk. Thus, I figured I’d go ahead and give it a shot. I took off my blogger/author hat and put on my academic hat and produced an article titled “Foot strike in runners: Influence on injury risk.”

It’s amazing how challenging it can be to switch writing gears between blogging, book writing, and academic writing, so hopefully the turned out to be somewhat coherent!

You can read my foot strike article on the Lower Extremity Review website here: http://www.lowerextremityreview.com/article/foot-strike-in-runners-influence-on-injury-risk

About Peter Larson

This post was authored by Peter Larson. Pete is a recovering academic who currently works as an exercise physiologist, running coach, and writer. He's also a father of three and a fanatical runner with a bit of a shoe obsession. In addition to writing and editing this site, he is co-author of the book Tread Lightly, and writes a personal blog called The Blogologist. Follow Pete on Twitter, Facebook, Google+, and via email.



Comments

  1. Jason Keck says:

    Wow that was a lot to process! One finding that stood out in my mind was how vertical impact measurements were lower in front foot loaders compared to heel loaders but not in the study in which people were instructed to lead with their front foot. What do you think about the idea that people are predisposed to a certain foot impact pattern, and that it is safest for them to use that pattern?

  2. That is a superb, sober, clinical, and fascinating state-of-the-union. It is one of very few articles I’ve read on this topic that I could show to my podiatrist friends without them rolling their eyes. Well done Pete!

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