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Contact Runblogger – E-Mail and Social Networks

Read below for email and contact policies and information.


Reader Emails

I’m going to be up-front honest here – my inbox is kind of a disaster, and it’s a big source of stress. I love hearing from readers, and generally read every email that arrives in my inbox, but responding has become more and more difficult as email volume has increased. When trying to balance spending time with my family (I have a wife and three little kids), writing blog posts, running (so I can test products I review), working in the clinic, and answering email, the latter tends to get short shrift. Though I try my best to respond to emails,  sometimes weeks may go by before I get a chance to tackle my inbox. Sometimes messages slip off the first page of my inbox get lost forever in the Gmail abyss (sadly, more often than I like to admit).

Given my email overload, I’ve tried to be diligent about attending to other communication avenues. If you have a question or want to get in touch, best bets for a timely response would be to:

A. Leave a comment on the blog. I usually respond to all blog comments within a few days. And often other readers will chime in as well.

B. Post in the Forum. If you have a running-related question, post it on the Runblogger Forum – you will be more likely to get a quick response from me or a fellow shoe junkie who participates. The Runblogger Forum is also a great spot to post questions on form, transitioning, injuries, etc. If you are looking for shoe advice, we can best help if provided some information about what you like in a running shoe. In particular, forefoot width (wide/narrow), sole cushion (firm/soft), heel-forefoot differential (zero drop, <4mm, 4-8mm), primary use (trail/road/racing/distance), etc.

C. Connect with me on Twitter. I’m pretty good about responding to short questions quickly on Twitter, and my Twitter client is almost always running in the background so I often will respond very quickly. You can find me at @runblogger.

D. If you would like to email me with a question you’d rather not put on a public forum, you can do so at pete262@runblogger.com. I do tend to be better at answering reader emails than PR/marketing inquiries, so feel free to send a message.

E. You can also connect with me on the Runblogger Facebook Page.


Notes for Marketers and PR Agencies:

I get pitched products on a daily basis, sometimes multiple products per day. Many that are completely unrelated to the content of this site – for example, BB guns and dating cruises are probably not a good fit :). I turn the majority of offers down, and for the most part I tend to review products that I purchase myself (with the exception of some footwear and fitness electronics, and even there about half of the products I review are purchased by me). This is my way of trying to manage the flood of offers that I get (and it makes doing taxes easier!). If you would like to pitch a product to me, you can do so at pete262@runblogger.com.

Please note, due to the volume of requests that I get, I do not generally publish unsolicited blog posts.

I generally do not post press releases (except previews of new shoes and certain fitness electronic devices).

I generally do not promote crowd-funding campaigns via blog postings.

I also generally do not promote races or events on Runblogger.

For advertising inquiries, go here.


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You can also get in touch with Pete via the following social networks:

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Recent Posts By Category: Running Shoe Reviews | Running Gear Reviews | Running Science

About Peter Larson

This post was authored by Peter Larson. Pete is a recovering academic who currently works as an exercise physiologist, running coach, and writer. He's also a father of three and a fanatical runner with a bit of a shoe obsession. In addition to writing and editing this site, he is co-author of the book Tread Lightly, and writes a personal blog called The Blogologist. Follow Pete on Twitter, Facebook, Google+, and via email.

Comments

  1. Mhorsportz says:

    Nice products. Here’s another for all you runners. mhorsportz.com

  2. Juan Sebastian Moncayo says:

    HEY PETER

    SEBASTIAN FROM ECUADOR WRITING HERE. GREAT BLOG. QUICK QUESTION, DO YOU HAVE ANY ARTICLES WHERE YOU LIST YOUR TOP 10 OR 20 PREFERENCES. I CURRENTLY RUN WITH LUNARELITE/LUNARLITE AND LOVE IT, BUT I NEED TO GET NEW SHOES SOON AND I’M LOOKING FOR GOOD OPTIONS AVAILABLE IN THIS MARKET. I SHOULD ADD THAT I HAVE A LITTLE OF A FLAT FOOT BUT THIS HAS NEVER BEEN AN ISSUE FOR ME. AND I WILL RUN AROUND 20 MILES A WEEK. THANKS FOR YOUR RESPONSE.

    REGARDS,
    SEBASTIAN

  3. Hi Pete
    This article may help explain why not everyone adapts to a fore/mid foot strike when running barefoot or in ultramimimal shoes.

    We can reduce shock by a few different kinematic strategies, one of which involves increased dorsiflexion at foot strike. This seems to be the favoured strategy by those running at slow speeds.

    link to journals.lww.com

    The magnitude and direction of ground reaction force at foot strike is very important. Higher vertical forces will give greater shock whereas higher horizontal (braking) forces will give less shock (but more torque). The position of the foot at foot strike may not be as important as the position, direction and forces on the centre of mass (COM) at foot strike. The greater the vertical vector of the COM the larger the shock. A more horizontal vector will give lower shock.
     If we keep:
     a)the COM consistently moving forward without excessive vertical up and down movement
    b) Foot strike occurring when vertical movement of the COM is minimal (ie earlier rather than later)
    then longer strides and heel striking aren’t as important

    Regards
    John Foster
    Physiodynamics
    Sciencerunning

    • Pete Larson says:

      John,

      Thanks for reminding me about that study – I had read Amby Burfoot’s post about it awhile back and thought it was interesting. The question I have, and it’s hard to tell from the abstract, is whether the runners in that study were barefoot or shod. I’d be curious if the “ankle-strategy” is possible/sustainable if barefoot. Jay Dicharry and I have talked a number of times about this issue as well – he agrees with you that positioning of the foot relative to the COM at contact is far more important than foot strike. I agree, but still not sure if heel striking is sustainable over the long term on a hard surface for a barefoot runner. Too many studies have show dramatically increased loading rates for barefoot heel strikers. For shod runners with some cushion, I’d agree that strike type is not as important as landing location.

      Anyway thanks again, I reference that paper in my most recent post on the Vibram ACE study.

      Pete

  4. Shanna Kurth says:

    I just websurfed my way to your 3 Sep 11 blog about Allan’s story with retrocalcaneal bursitis. Just wondering about follow up. Did he end up in surgery

  5. Hello, I am the creator of a new product a running accessory called BudLinX. I wanted to reach out to you and see if the runblogger.com would check us out @ budlinx.com or on our recently launched kickstarter.com project:

    link to kickstarter.com

    We are trying to get the word out so if you guys think that BudLinX may be a good running accessory for your readers any notice or mention would be much appreciated.

    Thanks In advance.

    Best Regards,

    BudLinX

  6. Page Lynch says:

    Hi, Pete! I’m a filmmaker from TN, and I just released a new film, interviewing a Boston Marathon runner, named Jeff Zimmer. I thought you might be interested in checking it out and blogging about it! I hope you like it! Here’s the link: link to vimeo.com

  7. whatsamattu says:

    Great blog.

    One thing: your photo of your running form, “how I found my midfoot…”

    It looks like you’re a little forward; that is, that you’re not landing right under your hip. Just wondering if that photo is representative of your form or if you’re even aware?

    I had a video taken of me once in http://www.invisibleshoe.com sandals and I noticed the same thing. So, it’s something I work on. Is it a defect or a feature?

    If you watch the Kenyans and top marathoners, they land right under their hip. I found an amazing youtube video pointing this out. Where the guy — I think he was a PT — took video from the of the course as they went by. He freeze framed parts and showed their hip angles and all sorts of interesting stuff.

  8. I believe it is the tendon that is above the arch, in front of the ankle on the left side of the right foot.

  9. Harrier46 says:

    I would like to see a review of sunglasses, looking for a pair that don’t fog up too bad, great blog, congrats on you Boston adventure!!

    • Pete Larson says:

      Wish I could help – my sunglasses are usually cheap pairs I buy at the drug
      store. I treat them too badly to buy anything expensive!

      Pete

  10. Bill Keir says:

    Hi Pete, My name is Bill from strobe safety gear
    I have a unique product that we are launching in the US next month, a High Viz /L.ED Smartphone armband , I would like to send you one for a review
    http://www.strobesafetygear.com
    Our goal is to give runners, cyclists etc a greater visibility on the road network to help prevent collisions, and we all know who comes off worst
    Cheers Bill

  11. Westie Magnuson says:

    Just wanted to say that I am anxiously awaiting you Mix Master review as I am trying to decide between them and the PureGrit for my next shoe.

  12. Pete,

    Still loving the blog.  I have been wondering if you have come across any new GPS tracking software for runs.  I have been using Sportttracks (pre 3.0 version) for years, but am wondering if there is some cloud software (other than Garmin connect) that people like out there.  Anything new?

    Best,
    Chase

  13. Cw Design says:

    Hello,
        I’m not sure if you’re into this kind of thing but I sell Runner’s Bib Albums for storing race memories. 

    link to etsy.com

  14. Pete,

    You have a great blog and I am extremely thankful that I found my way here. I have been a runner since September 2010 but I have made pretty nice progress in this short time, completing two half marathons under the mark of two hours and one hilly 30km race just a minute more than three hours. I, too, am a sucker for running shoes and I have tried so far Mizuno, Asics, New Balance and finally I found Saucony. I have been “forced” to wear structured and support shoes because of my pronation but I believe that I can do the change and start running minimalistic. I loved your blogs about change the strode from a heel to a mid-foot one and the study about how pronation does not really require support shoes. 

    I found your blog because I am eager to purchase a pair of Saucony Fastwitch  5 and your review and other entries are just pushing me forward to doing it.

    Another thing is I am working on running my first marathon by the end of November and I would like to do with a lower heel shoe but I am not sure I can manage marathon training together with a change of stride at the same time, I hope I can do/it can be done.

    Anyway, your blog is extremely inspiring and I will be following you on both Twitter and Facebook.

    More running for the people
    //Jack

    • Pete Larson says:

      Thanks Jack!

      I’d say just ease whichever shoe you plan to experiment with into your
      running very slowly and you’ll likely be just fine. Listen to your body, and
      if all is going well, you may be able to do the marathon in them if they are
      working out without any trouble. Good luck, and thanks for the feedback!

      Pete

  15. Anant Pandit says:

    Dear Peter,

    I was reading your old post on 2nd Metatarsal pain with Vibram Bikila. I feel same issue with my right foots 2nd Met.

    I have tried various types of socks to no socks, but havent been able to solve the issue. Pain starts post 4-5 mile mark. How did you solve your problem?

    Thanks.

    Anant

    • Pete Larson says:

      I stopped running in Vibrams, happens to me in almost every model and I think it has something to do with the toe pocket. Be really careful, second metatarsal stress fractures are not uncommon in people who overdo it in Vibrams.
      Sent from my iPad

      • Anant Pandit says:

        Thanks for the quick reply. I do enjoy barefoot feel of running. If out of your experience, for long distance which shoe would you recommend. Also yeah my feet sorta broad that was my major reason towards 5fingers.

        • Pete Larson says:

          If you want a similar feel to Vibram without the toe pockets, try Merrell Barefoot Flux or Vapor Glove, or Inov-8 Bare-X 180. All have wide toeboxes. For flat with some cushion, Merrell Bare Access, Inov-8 Road Xtreme, Altra Instinct, Mizuno Cursoris are worth a look.
          Sent from my iPad

  16. Pete: Here is what I am faced with according to my podiatrist:

    Kidner foot deformity (accessory tarsal navicular bone) with insertion Posterior tibial tendonitis. I asked for the diagnosis so I could do more research and he also told me to look up Pes Valgus.

    He is still recommending motion control shoes which I am hesitant to try. Are there any minimalist shoes that might help my condition? I am not looking for prescriptive advice but am hoping you have better news.

    Mahalo,
    Steve

  17. Brandon Rop says:

    Hey Pete,
    I was interested to know if youve tried out the Brooks PureCadence? If you have, would you prefer them to the Altra Instincts. And have you tried any Zoot shoes at all?

    • Pete Larson says:

      Unfortunately no on the Cadence, and Zoots tend to have too high a heel forefoot differential for my taste.
      Sent from my iPad

  18. Hi Pete,

    Have you seen the new saucony grid profile? 4mm drop!
    link to zappos.com
    Stu

  19. Robert Doherty says:

    Hi Pete
    Im running the Dublin city Maraton in one week.I am on my 3rd pair of Newton motion.The last pair I got were a new type they changed and put extra cushioning in them.I have about 220 miles up on them but think they are very stiff on the last few runs esp the last one.In your opinon how many miles shoud a shoe have up before they are no more use.Also how many miles does it take to break a new pair in.Trying to decide should I get a new pair or stick with what I have.A bit of a last minute crisis I suppose..

    • Pete Larson says:

      I’d say it depends both on the shoe and how you run in it. I
      personally don’t buy the rule of thumb that shoes need to be replaced
      every 300-500 miles. If they are holding up and still functioning, no
      reason to ditch them. As for break in, again it’s highly individual. I
      tend to run pretty well in most shoes right from the start, though I
      have found that some shoes like my Vibrams do a little better after a
      few runs. Ultimately, you want to be content with what you have on
      your feet going into the marathon – worrying about your shoes will not
      help, so do what will make you most comfortable going into the race.
      Wish I could be more helpful, but issues like this are so
      individualized that it’s hard to make a blanket statement.

      Pete

  20. Hi Pete,

    I think you’ll find this interesting – we have just published a video interview with Stefaan Engels who ran 365 marathons in 365 days! Amazing guy.

    Check it out here: link to bodyhack.com

    It includes a full video interview, plus an audio only version and full transcript. I hope you enjoy it.

    If you would like to mention it on your site and link to Bodyhack.com that would be super awesome.

    Any questions just let me know and I will do my best to answer them.

    Kind regards,

    Julian.

  21. Bex988 says:

    Pete,
    I love your blog. It has really inspired me to transition into minimal running, and I have to say that my pain has decreased since I made the switch! I still get some minor ITBS pain in the side of my left hip when running though. Do you have any suggestions for what I should do? I’ve been running in the Kinvaras for about a month now. Maybe try out some VFFs? Let me know what you think.

    • Pete Larson says:

      Thanks for the email! I’m really hesitant to offer any advice regarding
      injuries as I am not a medical professional and have not seen your running
      gait. I will say that new thinking seems to suggest that a lot of ITB
      problems stem from weakness in the hip muscles. A change in shoes might
      help, but it’s no guarantee, and the best approach would be to find a PT who
      knows running gait analysis to look at what you are doing and provide advice
      on how to proceed. I will also add that my wife was having major hip pain
      last winter, and changing to Vibrams helped her a lot and she is doing
      better now. However, no way of knowing for sure if you are suffering from
      the same thing.

      It’s complex, and seeing a knowledgeable doc is the best thing to do!

      Pete

  22. Pete that’s why I am interested in your opinion, I feel that there is a mechanical problem. Some background, this first surfaced lat Thanksgiving after a 4 mile run on a new route. My podiatrist suggests that the new route may have conteributed to the flare up. I went on a RICE regimen for at least 4 weeks, I did 3 one mile runs on flats when it flared up again. Went on RICE again for 6 plus weeks and started a walking regimen (3-4 miles) on flats. After a session that included hills the third flare up happened. I went to see the podiatrist again and he recommended motion control shoes again!

    I tried on several pairs of motion control and it felt like wearing boots! I hope you can shed some light on my condition with the extra bone and keep me on this minimalist path.

    Mahalo,
    Steve

  23. Westie Magnuson says:

    Hey Pete thanks for the great blog. It’s my favorite and most often checked one. I was curious about how you fit your running shoes as far as length, do you follow the thumb rule? Thanks

  24. Todd Mros says:

    What do you know about the Soft Star Dash? I’m thinking of buying them for trail but they are only available online.

  25. TheBirdShoe says:

    Hi Pete — love your blog. Quick question – the running warehouse coupon code RUNBLOG10 doesn’t seem to work for Brooks shoes. Is that a glitch of some kind or are they just not included in the discount?

  26. Pete. Let us know if you get your hands on a pair of Brooks Pure Drift early.

  27. Martino Liu says:

    For your info: link to concordia.ca

  28. Shawn Toner says:

    Hi Pete,

    I don’t think we are the only ones who can’t run properly in shoes. Check this out:

    link to youtube.com

    Shawn

  29. Chris P. in MA says:

    Hi, Pete,

    I think you left out the most minimal shoe of all – Converse Chuck Taylor hi-tops.  Works like a charm.  I tried jogging barefoot on my  local high school football field.  But with the chuck taylors you have a cheap, flat shoe that protects against cuts.  I got them at Marshalls for 20 bucks.

  30. Pete: I have been running in minimalist shoes for over three years with no problems until now. The inside of my right foot (in front of the ankle bone) is inflamed to the point where I can barely walk. I went to a podiatrist and got an x-ray on my right foot. The doctor explained that I have an extra bone there and as a result the tendon is not in it’s proper place and gets inflamed when I run now. He is recommending motion control shoes which I dread using. I am hoping you are familiar with this condition and can give me better news.

    Mahalo,

    Steve

  31. Gvitunic says:

    Great blog first of all. Do you have any favorite running jackets, especially for cold/rainy weather?

    • Pete Larson says:

      I have a Brooks jacket that I use most frequently, but it is a few years old
      and not made anymore. I also have a Saucony Vizi-Pro jacket that I like, but
      not as good at shedding water. Sorry I can’t be of more help!

  32. Anderson says:

    Hi Pete

    How are you?

    Im from Brasil and I always follow the news of your blog.

    First of all congratulations on your blog, which has very important information for worldwide runners.

    Sorry about my english it is not very good.

    I have a question and would like to ask for your help. I would be grateful if you can send me an email replying it.

    Some running shoes brands offering cushioning technology based in the return of energy or impulse response, in other words, when the foot touches the ground, this impact is generated a return energy in propulsion way, to ensure that the runner has a better income or performance but with less physical effort, in other words, more common among us runners, it is the response of the running shoe.

    I would like to know if this return of energy, is considered a negative energy, detrimental to the runner and if this can cause some injury to the knees or feet, Do you know anything about it?
    Recently I bought a shoe in a specialized running shop and they gave me this kind of information, do you know if it’s true or myth?

    Since already thank you for your attention

  33. Cool stuff. I dont’ have a high speed camera to capture my form in my Vibrams… but I figured I’d give stroboscopic flash photography a shot. I think I need to try this from behind to see pronation… since I can see that I’m not heel striking in my Vibrams.

    Enjoy
    link to flickr.com

  34. Juan Sebastian Moncayo says:

    Thanks for the quick response!! I do prefer somewhat cushioned and this is mostly for both. I am not certain if I am ready for something completely flat either, but I am open for the options. Thanks, hope this helps. About the Nikes, i really liked them. but since I am pretty new in the issue, I wonder if I could do better with other shoes.On August of this year I ran my first race, 15k in the altitude, and did 1:33:25 and 2 weeks ago I did 1:40:41 in my first 21k so I see improvement and I think if i do get better shoes and tools I can just increase my performance.

  35. great stuff Pete- keep up the good work!

  36. For anyone who is a big cross country runner out there, I need someone (coach or athlete) to interview for my history day project. I’m doing it on girls equality in cross country… If anyone’s interested please post back.

  37. Hi Pete,
    Big fan of your blog!
    The treadmill seen in this video with the Peg 29, is this your own personal treadmill? If not, do you own one?
    If so, what make and model? I’m in the market for one
    at the moment and respect your opinion.
    Maybe would be a good topic for future blog reviews?

    Regards.

    Doug

    • Doug-

      I bought it for the clinic, can’t recall the model off the top of my head. Will try to remember to check next time I’m in the office (on vacation right now).

  38. I read your review on the Nike Pegasus and I was impressed with your description of your pronation tendencies. But, why did you neglect to add that you had a “functional shortage” on one side.

    Did you self learn about pronation and or from other professionals?

    I liked the looks of the shoe for myself, right away (just for the comfort factor–I’m not a runner).

    You’re write up convinced me.–tks

  39. Henry Hart says:

    Hi Peter,

    I recently purchased a pair of Mizuno Ferus. Although they are good zero drop trainers I had hoped that they would be more durable: Like all my running shoes to date, the uppers broke out at the ball of my foot before my 30th run. I presume this could be due to a large volume of cross country and trial running.

    Could you recommend a pair of <6mm drop shoes that do not seem to do this?

    Many thanks,
    Henry

    • Unfortunately most of the trail shoes reviewed on this site are by guest reviewers since I tend to run roads more often. I do know that the Altra Lone Peak is a popular zero drop trail shoe among my readers, and the Inov-8 Trailroc series tend to get high marks has well. Personally I like the Salomon Sense Pro – the upper is randed and my guess is that durability would be good as a result.

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