Video: Boston Tribute at Fenway Park

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It just hasn’t felt right to post normal content this week. Though I’m not from Boston, I grew up in Connecticut and now live in New Hampshire. My wife was born in South Weymouth, and my sister lived for several years in Somerville. I grew up going to games at Fenway with my family, I cried my eyes out on that fateful day in 1986 when Buckner let the ball roll between his legs, I cursed Aaron Boone in 2003, and I celebrated in 2004 when my dream of finally watching the Red Sox win a World Series came true. New England is my home, and Boston is the de facto capital of this region.

This week feels like it has lasted for months. It started with triumph as I watched the  winners of the Boston Marathon race down Boylston St. while tracking the times of friends who were running in the race. It quickly morphed into tragedy, and a mad scramble to make sure that those same friends (and many of my students) were all ok. It ended with justice. It’s been quite a ride.

This afternoon at Fenway Park they played a tribute to the events of the week on the big screen. It’s a moving and emotional video, and I thought I’d share it here in case you haven’t seen it. Next week as things start to once again return to normal, we should always remember what happened, and keep those who were injured or who lost their lives in our thoughts and prayers.

Keep strong Boston!

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About Peter Larson

This post was authored by Peter Larson. Pete is a recovering academic who currently works as an exercise physiologist, running coach, and writer. He's also a father of three and a fanatical runner with a bit of a shoe obsession. In addition to writing and editing this site, he is co-author of the book Tread Lightly, and writes a personal blog called The Blogologist. Follow Pete on Twitter, Facebook, Google+, and via email.

Comments

  1. Kieran Campbell says:

    Well said Pete, thank you for voicing so eloquently what I think we are all feeling. I live in Australia and even though I am far removed from the tragedy of what happened in Boston, I still feel as though our community and our family has been needlessly attacked. It sickens me to think that something like this could take place at a time of such achievement for all those participating… and the culmination of many months of tireless support from those watching. My thoughts and prayers go out to Boston and all those hurt yesterday.

  2. I was disgusted when I saw the footage of this.
    It’s crazy. I hope they get whoever was responsible for this.

  3. Well said.

  4. Last night, I ran for the first time, and my 9 yo joined me. This was a planned run, and I’ve recently decided to take up the goal of starting running and do a 5K. Yesterday’s events were indeed sad. But one thing I told me daughter is that in spite of everything, we will run, we will do our best, and we will finish. We will not stop, or shrink back in fear.

    Your testimony was moving and I hope to learn more from you and other running bloggers. Thanks.

  5. M Louise Cunningham says:

    Nicely said Peter. My heart aches for them too…

  6. bob baks says:

    Hmmm, for some reason I’ve really been thinking a lot about working my ass off to qualify for Boston. Wonder how many people are thinking the same thing lately?

    • I’ve skipped the last 2 years, but am now wanting to be there again. It almost feels like it’s my responsibility to be with my extended running family in Hopkinton next April. I would not be surprised if a lot of people are feeling the way that you do.

      • bob baks says:

        The more I think about it, though, there is something a little ridiculous about all of this “they can’t stop us from running!!!” stuff. It looks like this was the work of a couple of a-holes who found an easy opportunity to visibly cause mayhem. Though it feels like it, it’s not exactly like the “running community” was attacked. I don’t know if any runners were even injured. I don’t think runners in particular need to feel victimized.

  7. Vybarr Cregan-Reid says:

    Lovely post, Pete – thank you.

  8. That’s awesome… I’m a Royals fan and couldn’t help but root for the Sox during the games. I just launched my own site btw in case you’re interested http://www.runningsoleo.com

  9. Well said Pete.

  10. Amanda Loudin says:

    Agree w/ Harold. Part of me is sad I didn’t go this year for the same reasons as you…it’s almost a survivor’s guilt kind of thing. My former LMT was running and her entire family was hurt badly–one daughter lost a leg, another has two broken legs, and her husband was burned/cut. I am just heartbroken for them and all the others. I have a huge hug waiting for all my friends when they get back home.

  11. BJ Smith says:

    I always look for my family near the finish of a race no matter how small. This hit too close to home. I held my son’s hand while he was going to sleep tonight thinking there is a father out there that would give anything to be able to do the same. My prayers go out to the victims and their families.

  12. disqus_Fp2oq1Qmqw says:

    I think the whole worldwide running community is suffering. All of us who have at least once change our lives and cross a final line of a running competition felt the pain. Hope for better days. Sad, very sad, but life goes on.
    best regards,
    Sergio (Brasil)

  13. Kevin Schell says:

    Thank you for writing this, Pete. What a terrible, terrible day yesterday was.There are those who seem only to have a desire to destroy but yesterday they were outnumbered by amazing compassionate people who didn’t hesitate to help the injured. The bomber(s) intended to incite fear and cause pain and they succeeded but they probably didn’t count on inspiring all of the unbelievable acts of bravery, kindness, love, compassion and selflessness that occurred in the moments following the explosions. Our shared aspirations and desire to help each other achieve is beautiful and powerful. Humanity defeated terror once again.

  14. Sarah @RunFarGirl says:

    This is exactly how I feel: haven’t really had the words for a blog post this week. Like you I’m from the area (NH) and feel a connection to Boston. My brother, his wife and my 1yo nephew were sitting in the grand stand watching the marathon finish when the first bomb went off. They are physically safe, but emotionally changed forever. They are very much still in that moment. It has been hard to “move on” knowing what they are going through. Thanks for posting this!

  15. Staffan Dahlgren says:

    Well said Pete, I’ve been thinking of this little boy all day and I also feel the entire running community has been attacked. It’s so sad and the evil is almost beyond whats imaginable! Two friends of mine ran, both of them luckily finished very close to three hours and are fine. I am posting what I wrote on the Runners World page on FB earlier today,

    I qualified last year and so much wanted to be there yesterday, but I wasn’t. A marathon is 26,2 miles of determination and exhaustion but also of joy, friendlyness and solidarity. Irregardless of race, political views, religion and whatelse I have yet to meet an unfriendly runner! If people across the world ran more miles there would a whole lot less of this shit and evilness going on in the world, that’s for sure. Someday I will be on that bus on my way to Hopkinton for the start of the Boston Marathon together with you and I think we should not and cannot stop running due to madness and evilness of one or a very few sick individuals who did this. Keep running!

  16. don’t exactly know what the bomber really wanted other than to hurt people…a marathon was on my bucket list before…but now i REALLY want to do one

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